etomi

26 Jul 2006 1,508 views
 
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photoblog image Slave Trade Series: Enemy Coast

Slave Trade Series: Enemy Coast

Each Fort had to be protected from invasion so these canons were used to fire large balls filled with gunpowder at enemy ships.

The principal early struggle was between the Dutch and the Portuguese. With the loss of Elmina in 1642 to the Dutch, the Portuguese left the Gold Coast permanently. The next 150 years saw kaleidoscopic change and uncertainty, marked by local conflicts and diplomatic maneuvers, during which various European powers struggled to establish or to maintain a position of dominance in the profitable trade of the Gold Coast littoral. Forts were built, abandoned, attacked, captured, sold, and exchanged, and many sites were selected at one time or another for fortified positions by contending European nations.


Both the Dutch and the British formed companies to advance their African ventures and to protect their coastal establishments. The Dutch West India Company operated throughout most of the eighteenth century. The British African Company of Merchants, founded in 1750, was the successor to several earlier organizations of this type. These enterprises built and manned new installations as the companies pursued their trading activities and defended their respective jurisdictions with varying degrees of government backing. There were short-lived ventures by the Swedes and the Prussians.

The Danes remained until 1850, when they withdrew from the Gold Coast. The British gained possession of all Dutch coastal forts by the last quarter of the nineteenth century, thus making them the dominant European power on the Gold Coast.

www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/history/slave-trade.php

Slave Trade Series: Enemy Coast

Each Fort had to be protected from invasion so these canons were used to fire large balls filled with gunpowder at enemy ships.

The principal early struggle was between the Dutch and the Portuguese. With the loss of Elmina in 1642 to the Dutch, the Portuguese left the Gold Coast permanently. The next 150 years saw kaleidoscopic change and uncertainty, marked by local conflicts and diplomatic maneuvers, during which various European powers struggled to establish or to maintain a position of dominance in the profitable trade of the Gold Coast littoral. Forts were built, abandoned, attacked, captured, sold, and exchanged, and many sites were selected at one time or another for fortified positions by contending European nations.


Both the Dutch and the British formed companies to advance their African ventures and to protect their coastal establishments. The Dutch West India Company operated throughout most of the eighteenth century. The British African Company of Merchants, founded in 1750, was the successor to several earlier organizations of this type. These enterprises built and manned new installations as the companies pursued their trading activities and defended their respective jurisdictions with varying degrees of government backing. There were short-lived ventures by the Swedes and the Prussians.

The Danes remained until 1850, when they withdrew from the Gold Coast. The British gained possession of all Dutch coastal forts by the last quarter of the nineteenth century, thus making them the dominant European power on the Gold Coast.

www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/history/slave-trade.php

comments (11)

  • Oz
  • United States
  • 26 Jul 2006, 00:51
Wow..i like this one!!!
p.s. I wont tell u to call me again. Instead i am goin to show u pepper.
E Etomi: Who do you think you are threatening eh. What happened to respect for elders? You are already in hot peppersoup. Wait there for me. Darn, no flights
awesome shot. i love the contrast of the black cannons against the white walls. you did a great job of capturing the crystal water against the sky and rocks.
E Etomi: Thanks Nicole, the PP also helped
  • atunbi
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Jul 2006, 06:30
okay, I am not sure, colors look almost there though.
E Etomi: Thanks...do you mean they are not clolourful enough?
BEST OF THE SERIES!!!! grin
E Etomi: You think so? Thanks! I thought the noise was a bit much....just realised i need to reduce my ISO values.
  • incubus
  • london
  • 26 Jul 2006, 11:21
this is sooo good dear..... well done! grin
E Etomi: Thanks Miss incubus
  • Etomi's Number One Fan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Jul 2006, 14:15
Not bad dear ;-)
Beautiful shot, it reminds me of the movie "Amistad" A vicious trade in human lives is brought to life here
Nice stuff....may I ask what you're doing in Ghana?
E Etomi: I went to Ghana for a weekend trip. I think thats where the STRONG mosquitoes bit me at some rainforest tour.
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Jul 2006, 17:28
Stonking shot.
Extremely busy Suby
Very well done and very interresting text - Thanx - ;-)
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 28 Jul 2006, 17:53
I love this shot! I agree with others who said it's the best of the series so far.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/4000s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO800
focal length 29.0mm
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