etomi

24 Jul 2006 1,176 views
 
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photoblog image Slave Trade Series: Condemned

Slave Trade Series: Condemned

So I'm back and feeling great! And now hopefully there will be no more interruptions in the series. Enjoy!

After being captured, the slaves endured a long walk from their villages to the coast where the forts were built. There those that survived the walk, called the 'Death March' because it was so strenuous, were packed into small dirt-floored shacks known as baracoons which held 30 to 50 Africans within a 10 by 15 ft floorspace covered with vomit, urine, feces and blood. Day and night the temperature within the cell was well over 90 degrees. Dehydration through diarrhea, vomiting and sweating was a common form of death.

Here Africans were also branded with hot irons. In such unsanitary conditions, the burns often became infected inducing fevers or gangrene. These hapless victims were clubbed, whipped or shot to death as a warning to other Africans to remain in good health.

FROM:http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Classroom/9912/maafa.html

This room in the picture was for the condemned. Slaves who misbehaved or resisted capture or tried to kill themselves would be put here to starve to death. The only light in this room came from the door. A mass burial would take place only after the last slave to be put in had died.

Slave Trade Series: Condemned

So I'm back and feeling great! And now hopefully there will be no more interruptions in the series. Enjoy!

After being captured, the slaves endured a long walk from their villages to the coast where the forts were built. There those that survived the walk, called the 'Death March' because it was so strenuous, were packed into small dirt-floored shacks known as baracoons which held 30 to 50 Africans within a 10 by 15 ft floorspace covered with vomit, urine, feces and blood. Day and night the temperature within the cell was well over 90 degrees. Dehydration through diarrhea, vomiting and sweating was a common form of death.

Here Africans were also branded with hot irons. In such unsanitary conditions, the burns often became infected inducing fevers or gangrene. These hapless victims were clubbed, whipped or shot to death as a warning to other Africans to remain in good health.

FROM:http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Classroom/9912/maafa.html

This room in the picture was for the condemned. Slaves who misbehaved or resisted capture or tried to kill themselves would be put here to starve to death. The only light in this room came from the door. A mass burial would take place only after the last slave to be put in had died.

comments (14)

  • incubus
  • london
  • 24 Jul 2006, 10:14
awwwwww such insanity and evil!!!!! I am sooo hurt :'( by that story........Great shot tho!!
E Etomi: Thanks incubus. Its terrible to think human beings went through that.
  • Frank
  • Germany
  • 24 Jul 2006, 10:50
Very great shot.
E Etomi: Thanks Frank
  • barbara
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 24 Jul 2006, 11:32
This is an awesome shot E...well done!
  • sk
  • United States
  • 24 Jul 2006, 12:56
A VERY GOOD SHOT and a very scary story, human beings are messed up
E Etomi: yup! It was emotionally drianing to do these tours..and you should have seen the tour guides..very dramatic
  • barbara
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 24 Jul 2006, 14:49
You know I've come back here to look again at this. I'm very actually jealous here.. I would have like to take this sad
I think this is one of your best - that's just my humble, non-technical, gut feel. You should send it to the guys who run the fort or any Ghanian tourism site..they could definitely use this.
E Etomi: Thanks Barbara smile. Good idea...I'll check for their sites.
  • Andy
  • Pembrokeshire, Wales
  • 24 Jul 2006, 14:56
Superb shot, depicting the dark & horific scene you have described very well. Thanks for sharing these with us.
E Etomi: Thanks for commenting Andy
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, Great Britain (UK)
  • 24 Jul 2006, 16:06
I really like this.
Suby
  • Oz
  • United States
  • 24 Jul 2006, 21:52
Depressing!!
p.s Hope ure feeling better..i missed ur call..(7am is just wickedness)...but u know me and phones!!
Very nice shot...shot reflects the story
  • Sinem
  • MK, United Kingdom
  • 24 Jul 2006, 23:45
Wow. Amazing shot, powerful evidence of the cruelty of man against man.
  • Etomi''s Number 1 Fan
  • UK
  • 25 Jul 2006, 12:51
Serious stuff!!!

You're improving, ofcourse that SUITCASE you call a camera has something to do with it! Haha!

Well Done x
WoW....u r killing me!!!.....This is lovely!!
  • Laurie
  • United States
  • 27 Jul 2006, 12:57
Horrible, horrible. It really boggles the mind. It's horrific enough that slavery existed at all, but to think of the unbelievable abuse of such a "valuable commodity" is baffling. I cannot grasp the concept at all. Just unreal and extremely disturbing on too many levels.

This must be such a painful place to visit. Thank you for this series.

Glad you are feeling better!
  • deji77
  • United Kingdom
  • 30 Jul 2006, 18:35
One of my favourites of the series. Keep it up!

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camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/6s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO800
focal length 17.0mm
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